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3 Books about Manners

Recently I discussed the importance of manners. This week I have a few more books to add to a study on manners. Author, Julia Cook, has written several stories about various topics about social skills.

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Table Talk is about… table manners! Here is a quote from the book, “Did you know that table manners really matter? They’re more than just eating. They’re about being kind and considerate of others, and being respectful of people’s feelings.” Some things mentioned are washing your hands, waiting your turn until everyone has their food, saying please and thank you and not reaching across the table for something. After reading the book you can practice the good manners that you read. Do you know the poem, The Goops?  Here is the poem for copywork. NOTE: Whoops! I accidentally left out the word saw on the first line!  The Goops

 

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Bragging is the focus in the book, Well I Can Top That! 

Bradford Robert Alexander Donely always feels the need to be better than his friends. Primarily by telling outlandish tales, he appears to do everything better. His teacher helps him to see that instead of being a “one-upper”, he can be a “pull-upper”, in other words, encourage people and allows others to be number one.

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Decibella and her 6 inch Voice

One of my sons had a difficult time in using what I called an “inside voice”.  He also had a friend who was equally as noisy and we had to remind the boys on many occasions to consider others around them. Decibella, or rather, Isabella, is a young lady who needs to be reminded of which voice to use throughout the day. Ranging from the whisper, to a 6 inch voice, to SLURPADOODLE, Isabella must learn to gauge her voice to meet the appropriate noise level, depending upon the situation.

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What kind of things you can do with these books when you are reading to your children?  Ask if they have ever had these situations happen to them. What ways could the characters do things differently? Why is it a pleasant thing to have manners? How can you show kindness and consideration to others. Make a list of opportunities. Discuss and practice the following social skills.

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Fun Outdoor Activities for Children

imgresSpring is here! I can feel it in the air and I am sure your children can as well! Here are some outdoor activity ideas for them to enjoy.

What about the old-fashioned outdoor games of hopscotch; jumping rope and Hide and Seek?

Red Light, Green Light; Simon Says; Follow the Leader, and Mother May I (see how to play below) are games that require no supplies and provide your children with the opportunity to follow directions. Which, by the way, are essential to school. 🙂

Does your daughter like to draw? Sidewalk chalk is all kinds of fun. Be sure and take a picture of the creations afterwards.

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Sidewalk Chalk (homeschooling ideas.com)

  • Plaster of Paris or egg shells
  • Tempera Paint- liquid or powder
  • Old bowls or pots for mixing
  • Molds –
      Have fun choosing! You could make small chalks with ice cube trays, big fat toilet roll or kitchen roll chalks. Or use popsicle or play-doh molds for something different. Shaped silicone baking trays can also be used.
  • Water
  • Spatula or old spoon
  • Possibly needed – Wax paper and/or petroleum jelly; duct tape; tin foil or plastic wrap.

Next you need to prepare your molds. Paper towel rolls or toilet rolls should be cut to size if they are too long for you. Tape over one end to stop the chalk mixture running out when you fill them (you can use duct tape). They also will need lining with wax paper or freezer paper to make them waterproof. Disposable molds won’t need any preparation – you can always cut them away from the chalk if they get stuck. Coat any other molds (such as your baking trays or ice cube trays) with petroleum jelly so the chalk will slip out easily when dry. Or alternatively, you could line them with tin foil or film wrap.

Bubbles

Who doesn’t like to blow bubbles and pop them? Bubble recipes follow for your son to enjoy. Bubble wands can be made out of pipe cleaners (craft stems) that are twisted together for durability.

Exploratorium Bubble Formula
from the Exploratorium web site

2/3 cup Joy dishwashing soap
1 gallon water
2 to 3 tablespoons of glycerin
(available in pharmacies or chemical supply houses)

Cyndi’s Bubble Recipes
from the Nathan’s Wish web site

1/2 cup of dishwashing liquid (Dawn or Joy)
2 cups of water
2 teaspoons of sugar

Cyndi suggests adding a dab of food coloring for colorful bubbles. Mix the solution and place in a shallow pan (or refill your old bubble containers). NOTE: More recipes and fun with bubbles are available at the website link above.

Homemade Bubbles
from Kids Domain Craft Exchange

1/2 (500 ml) cup dishwashing detergent
4-1/2 (4.5 liter) cup water
4 tablespoons (60 ml) glycerin
(available in pharmacies or chemical supply houses)
Measure out the water, detergent, and glycerin into container with a cover and stir gently. Note: The longer you let the mixture set, the larger the bubbles are and the longer they seem to last.
  • Red Light, Green LightUsing  a large yard have all the kids line up on one side. the person who is “it” stays in the middle of the yard.  When “it” says green light, all the kids run as fast as they can.  When “it” says red light, everyone stops. whoever doesn’t stop is out. “It” keeps saying red light or green light until all the kids are out or has gone from one end of the yard and back to where they started from.The last person to make it back to the starting line is “it”.  There is a  rule that you have two seconds to come to a complete stop or hit the ground.
  • Simon Says

One person is designated Simon, the others are the players. Standing in front of the group, Simon tells players what they must do. However, the players must only obey commands that begin with the words “Simon Says.” If Simon says, “Simon says touch your nose,” then players must touch their nose. But, if Simon simply says, “jump,” without first saying “Simon says,” players must not jump. Those that do jump are out.
Objective
Follow directions and stay in the game for as long as possible! The last player standing wins and becomes the next Simon. If you’re Simon, the object is to try to trick the players to follow your commands when they shouldn’t.

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  • Follow the Leader

One player, the Leader, begins moving around with actions that the rest of the players must mimic. Anything — including wildly flailing his hands or furiously scratching his head — what the leader does, the others must follow. Those players who disobey, or lag behind the leader’s motions are out of the game. The last person standing becomes the new Leader. It is best to play with three or more. 

  • Mother May I? 

This game is a simple childhood action game that might be good for reinforcing the use of manners. One person is chosen as the “mother” (or “captain” if it is a male).  She or he stands facing away from a line of kids and selects a child at random, or in order.  The mother/captain calls out a direction, step type, and number of steps.  For example, the mother/captain can say: “Scott, you may take seven (or any other number)’ baby/normal/giant steps forward/backward.”The child then responds with “Mother may I?” (or “Captain may I?” if it is a male player in charge).  The mother/captain states “Yes” or “No”, depending on her whim, and the child obeys and takes the steps.  If the child forgets to ask “Mother may I?” then he/she goes back to the beginning of the line.  The first one to touch the Mother/Captain wins and becomes the new Mother/Captain.

An alternate version of the game is similar: each child takes turns asking, “Mother/Captain may I take [x kind of] steps?” The child who is mother (or captain) replies yes or no.

There are other kinds of steps possible for this game – be creative and come up with your own.  For example, there are:

  • Bunny hops: hopping like a bunny.
  • Frog hops: going down on all fours and hopping up like a frog.
  • Scissors steps: jump while crossing your feet, then jump while uncrossing them was one step.
  • Skip steps: steps as though one is skipping.

Dental Health Month

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February is Dental Health Month and this year’s theme (2017) is about the importance of drinking tap water. At first glance you may not see the connection between water and teeth, but sweet, sugary drinks promote tooth decay. Listed below are activities and some resources to help you teach.

How about starting out with the proper way to brush those pearly whites?

Video The is a 2 minute clip from Colgate about proper brushing.

Nothing quite helps with discussing the effects sugar has on teeth than an experiment!

SCIENCE Experiment

You will need: 1 jar, 1 can of dark soda, and 1 egg (not hard boiled)

Empty the contents of the soda into the jar. Add the egg and cover the jar. Have your daughter predict what is going to happen to the egg. Write down the prediction. Ask her how long she thinks it will take for something to happen to the egg. Record this as well.

Check the egg after one day. What has happened to the egg? Write down observations.(You will notice that the egg is slightly discolored. No change with the shell.)

Check the egg in one week and take the it out of the jar. Write and/or draw what has happened to the egg. (You will notice that it is getting darker, but the shell is not softening yet.)

Check in two weeks and take the it out of the jar. Write and/or draw what has happened to the egg. (Egg continues to darken, but the shell is not soft.)

Check in three weeks and take the it out of the jar. Write and /or draw what has happened to the egg. (Egg continues to darken, and the shell might be showing signs of softening.)

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Check in four weeks and take the it out of the jar. Write and/or draw what has happened to the egg. (Egg is very dark and some, if not all, of the enamel should be worn off. (Eww!)

 

How about a game or art activity to help with dental health?

Eat This! Not That! Game  Cut out pictures of food from magazines or grocery flyers, or images from the internet . Ask your son to find healthy foods, such as fruits, vegetables and milk. Then look for unhealthy foods, such as candy and soda. Put all these pictures into a large pile. Take two small brown bags and draw a “happy tooth” on one bag and a “sad tooth” on the other. Together, sort out the pictures and place them in the correct bag. (source: http://www.colgate.com)

Art project: Older students can create a a collage of pictures showing good and bad choices.

Here are some worksheets. 🙂

American Dental Association has some worksheets for elementary students. Just scroll down the page to download them.

Oral Health Made Easy You could use some of these worksheets when you watch the brushing video.

Teeth Printables for preschool and early kindergarten at Mama’s Learning Corner look like fun for younger students. The packet includes a maze, dot-to-dot, writing pages, and the alphabet.

What happens when people see actual teeth that have been soaked in soda?

Video  This is an interesting and funny video about young adult soda drinkers. I am not sure they changed their minds, but hopefully they did!

 

 

Pigeon: Helping with Health

Why don’t children in general like to take showers or baths? Maybe it is because they don’t want to take time out because they feel they will miss out on all the fun they are having. Or, the water gets to cold, or they don’t like wrinkly fingers…(those were all of my excuses!)

As I have posted on my blog recently, health is an area that homeschool moms don’t think to include  when teaching. You do not have to use a formal text, but take some time to write down a few topics you are covering so that you can check it off of your “subjects studied this year ” list.

I found a cute book that I think will naturally lead into the topic of personal hygiene. You won’t have to point fingers at your child, but watch the story of Pigeon unfold and hopefully, point out some things that happens to him as a result of needing a bath.

You can watch a video or read the book. I wonder if you can entice your reluctant bath-taker by reading the book to them while they are in the bath?? 🙂

~Lisa

The Baby App

Oh joy! I am going to be a grandma! 🙂 I am beyond excited and I can see that as I look for educational ideas to share with my daughter-in-law that I will naturally post ideas for you as well.

So, the first one I am sharing is called Baby Center. Not only is this a wonderful sight for parents-to-be, but it is also terrific for anyone else who is interested in the development of a little one. This can benefit the understanding of development for siblings, grandparents, and others.

If you are wanting to teach human growth and development to your middle or high school student this would be an invaluable tool. The development of the baby is described every week and his/her length and weight is given to you as well. If you are expecting this would be a terrific way to show your children the development of your baby to big brother(s) and sister(s).

Here are actual pictures of the development of the baby from week to week. The baby is compared to a fruit or vegetable as well, which I appreciate. It is hard to imagine what the baby’s size is, but  this website does a great job in giving you some perspective.

I hope this website will be a valuable resource to you.

~Lisa