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Free Homeschool Lesson Plan Templates

Whether you choose an unschooling approach or a traditional approach to homeschooling, keeping track of learning is essential to having a successful school year. There are many wonderful lesson plan books that you can purchase, but money can be tight at this time of the year, especially after your curriculum purchases. ūüôā I have a list of resources from which you can choose.

This free resource is an editable lesson plan template that has daily and weekly lesson plan templates. While it is for a traditional classroom, you can edit it to meet your needs. Click on the picture for the resource link.

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Susan at Homeschooling Hearts and Minds has several different types of planning sheets from which you can choose.  She has formal lesson planning sheets as well as more informal learning logs.

The Homeschool Mom has a planner for not only school but for home as well. You do have to subscribe to download the pages.

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Our Good Family has a lesson planning sheet that includes not only the subjects, but also daily goals, notes, and things to work on with your student.

I liked the sound of this planner resource, Planned Spontaneity. This is a free E-book that has practical steps in helping you plan your year. Drop by Homeschooling Ideas to download a copy for yourself (Click on the book for link).Screen Shot 2019-09-02 at 6.46.01 AM.png

Have a great week! ~Lisa~

The Growth Mindset

The buzzword, “growth mindset”, has been around in the field of education for several years now and I think it is worth considering when you are teaching your daughter/son. It can also help you as a teacher and a student.

What is it? According to an article that I was reading at Mindsetworks.com, “Dr. Carol Dweck coined the terms fixed mindset and growth¬†mindset¬†to describe the underlying beliefs people have about learning and intelligence. When students believe they can get smarter, they understand that effort makes them stronger. Therefore they put in extra time and effort, and that leads to higher achievement.”

Did you know our brains are able to be rewired? The connections can be strengthened, changed, and reinforced depending upon the actions we take. You can do that for your child as you homeschool.

Praise your son/ daughter in the areas where s/he is strong and encourage in the areas where there are weaknesses. For instance, if your daughter is a great speller but is having difficulty with more complex words, praise her and show her all the words she can spell with ease. Show her what she has done with single-syllable words and help her break those longer words down into smaller, more manageable pieces. Praise her efforts and come alongside her.

Does your son struggle in math? Perhaps long division is a difficult concept.¬† Try pointing out the concept that he knows, “Wow! You did a fantastic job on this short division problem (16/4).¬† Now let’s try 168/4. Work on the problem together and do several more. You can encourage him by saying, “I know you can do this; I will help you.” give lots of high fives and fist bumps along the way.

It is important to come alongside your student and show her you are supporting her and that she can do it. Think about when you were learning to ride a bicycle. You had someone else run alongside you, holding the bike up so that it wouldn’t tip over. You needed this until you had the confidence to balance and do it yourself. That process and the mastery of a new concept or idea is what having an, “I can do it.” mindset is all about.

Here is a book that I believe will help your child to understand the power of thinking, the power of their brain. You can click on the image to read about the book.

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Everyone makes mistakes. That can be hard for a child to understand and give themselves grace to learn or grow from that experience. I have to remind myself of this quite often as well. ūüôā Here are some books to read and discuss:

Beautiful Oops! is a quick read, but there are so many things you can talk about with your son as you read it. Don’t see mistakes as failures, but as possibilities.

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I have a confession, when I was a little girl I said’, “I can’t!” A Lot.¬† I remember my mom saying, “Can’t never did anything.” She didn’t let me quit on things and I wasn’t all that happy with her at the time, but I have come to realize that she was teaching me a life lesson that I try to apply in my life when things get tough. I can’t do it by myself, but with God’s help, I can. The title of this next book is a sentence that I want to adopt in my own thinking.:)

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I want to encourage you today; you can teach your child. You can help them because you are a good tutor. Your son/ daughter will get the difficult concepts that at first may seem monumental. Keep praising them, walking alongside them, and pretty soon that tough thing will be added to the growing list of things they can do.

Have a great week!  ~ Lisa ~

 

Record Keeping for your Homeschool

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Before your children throw away all of their schoolwork for the year, stop them! It is helpful to keep a record of what your child has done not only for posterity’s sake but in the event that the superintendent’s office should question whether your child attended school. I was given the advice many moons ago to keep records for three years.

Also, it is fun to look back over the years and see what your child has learned. I actually kept a labeled binder of schoolwork for each year and just stored it in the attic. One of the hardest things to do was to throw it away after my sons had graduated. lol Silly, I know, but there was a lot of blood, sweat, prayers, laughter, and tears in those binders!

So, what kind of things would I recommend you to keep for your records?

  • Samples of your student’s best work. Pages or narratives from the beginning, middle, and end of the year would show a representation of the year.
  • Photos of activities such as experiments, sports, plays, field trips, nature studies, gardening, projects that have been completed, artwork. The sky’s the limit!
  • Programs of concerts, plays, church programs, recitals, etc.
  • List of materials used and topics studied
  • Report cards/ grades if issued
  • A copy of the portfolio review assessment or testing scores
  • A general reading list of books completed.
  • School photos
  • Achievement awards
  • High school transcript

Optional :

  • A school calendar
  • Lesson plan book
  • List of extracurricular activities

In a separate binder:

I advise you to keep your yearly notification records separate from your student’s school binder. These documents should be kept in a safe place and photographed in the unlikelihood of something happening to your official paperwork.

  • A copy of the completed Home Education Notification Form
  • A copy of your list of textbooks
  • A copy of the portfolio review assessment or testing scores
  • A copy of the topics you are studying for the year
  • The signed receipt from the school (Send your notification form by registered mail with a registered receipt)
  • Your excusal letter from compulsory education

Have a great week! If you are in need of a portfolio review please contact me. I would love to serve you and your family and help you to meet the requirement to homeschool here in Ohio.

~Lisa~

 

 

 

 

 

Safety Ideas for Severe Weather

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Spring is upon us and the chance of severe weather is a possibility. So, why not take the time to prepare your family in case the electricity goes off or you need to go to the basement. I think being prepared ahead of time will be less stressful AND you can teach safety as well.

Make an emergency kit. Gather supplies and place them in a plastic bin with a lid. If you find you need to be in the basement waiting out a storm you can pass the time knowing that you have some supplies for the family. FEMA recommends the following items:

  • Waterproof matches
  • Candles
  • Protein bars or snack crackers
  • Water¬†–¬†one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
  • Food¬†– at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
  • Battery-powered or hand crank radio
  • Flashlight
  • Extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Dust mask to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to¬†shelter-in-place
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
  • Wrench or pliers to¬†turn off utilities
  • Manual can opener for food
  • Local maps
  • Cell phone with chargers and a backup battery
  • Plasticware, paper plates
  • A change of clothing for each person
  • Personal care products (toothbrush, deodorant, etc.)
  • Plastic bags- quart and gallon size
  • Add a deck of cards or a travel game to the bin for you to play in case you need to be in the room for a long period of time.
  • Have a blanket and pillow and/or a sleeping bag so that you can be comfy.

School Ideas (safety and other subjects):

  • Create the emergency kit together. Have your child gather the clothes, food supplies, etc.
  • Discuss the importance of seeking shelter during a storm.
  • Show your son or daughter where a good place would be to go to in the event of a severe storm. Practice going there and turning off the lights to simulate failed electricity.
  • Have you or your child look at a map to locate tornado alley.
  • Identify cloud types
  • Discuss what creates a thunderstorm, a severe storm, and a tornado

Be Safe! ~Lisa~ 

 

 

Homeschooling with Real Books

Homeschooling with real books (library/trade books) is much more interesting than exclusively using a textbook. The use of literature can be used to introduce, develop, or reinforce a concept that you are teaching. You may totally agree with me and are getting excited about doing this, but then comes the next thought, “Where do I begin? What books would I use?”

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Serious Fun: Homeschooling with Real Books by Kristin Draeger is just such a resource you need! Kristin shares her personal homeschool experience of how she created this 120+ page list of books, games, puzzles, videos, and music.  I appreciate that she has created such a fantastic open-and-go reference guide. She has taken the time to do this so that you can do other things! Kristin has categorized the books into the subjects of math, science, history/ geography, literature, grammar, and art history. She has also created subcategories of books for students K-3 and 4th-8th grade.

I love that Kristin has included extras for your student like this CD (or streaming option) that is about addition, skip counting, and money, but also includes some art, history, and information about space.

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Math games are a terrific way to practice what has been taught without the use of yet another worksheet. Kristin recommends this logic game and I second it as my sons had this when they were young. It is compact and comes with a travel bag so that it can be played in the car or taken to doctor’s appointments. If you’d rather not take it out, it can be used as a culminating activity after your math lessons. If you click on the picture, you not only see the game, but you can watch a short video on the webpage on how it is played.

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Serious Fun: Homeschooling with Real Books is a great deal at just $10.00. This is one book that I think you would return to time and again for ideas for your library trips or stock your own library shelves with real books.

  • Note- Kristin mentions the Kratt brothers¬†¬†Zoboomafoo series. You can click on the highlighted link to watch these science programs for your K-3 grader since they were not released onto DVD.

Have a great week! ~Lisa~ 

I received a free review copy of this book from the author/publisher in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.