Archives

Draw and Write Through History

Are you interested in combining history, art, and cursive this year? The Draw and Write Through History series of six books does just that.

The workbooks are in full-color and are Non-consumable. The recommended ages are 8 and up. I think this would be fun to do together with your son or daughter. They are affordable with each priced at $10.00 or if you purchase all 6 you save $1.00 per book. These are from a Christian worldview and are divided into the following time periods:   Creation to Jonah  |  600BC to 395AD  |  793AD to 1600s |1492 to 1781  |  The 1800s  | 20th Century

If you are curious to learn more, here is a description of the second book, Greece and Rome. “Take your children on an exciting journey through time as you draw and write your way through history! Learn how to draw a Greek soldier, the Lighthouse of Alexandria, The Great Wall of China, Hannibal’s war elephants, the Colosseum, a gladiator, and more in this second book in the Draw and Write Through History series. Each drawing is broken down into easy to follow steps. Cursive handwriting copywork about history is also included.” (source: http://www.amazon.com)

 

Have a great week!  ~Lisa ~ 

Amoeba Sisters: Biology Fun

Biology can be boring, intimidating and frustrating if you don’t have an understanding of the topic. I have a great resource for you called Amoeba Sisters. These are 10 minute or less videos with fun cartoons and interesting biology topics. They also have gifs that you can print off as well as worksheets.

Here is a link to the videos:  Amoeba Sisters 

What about looking at their website? Clicking on the picture will take you to the website.

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Have a fabulous week! ~Lisa~

Community Helpers

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Community helpers cover a broad spectrum in our society and children are taught about them in early elementary school. Having hands-on activities is a fun way to discuss what a community helper is (someone who serves the community) and what types of things they do. You can use these as an introduction to a unit for Social Studies, something you and your child do together, or independent activity as a culminating activity.  Click on the image of each picture to take you directly to the link.

Whose Tools is a free folder game for your student to learn about helpers.

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Community Helpers Matching Worksheet Does your daughter or son know what tools each of these professionals need for their job?

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Free Sorting Mats of Community Helpers. You can laminate these for durability to be reused. This is only a sample and you can purchase additional mats for this unit.

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Community Helper Hats You can use these hats for play or for sorting. The directions are easy to follow to make the hat, and there is also a video should you wish to watch it. The police officer hat is free and if you would like to receive all 10 hats, sign up for the newsletter. Screen Shot 2019-07-08 at 6.19.31 AM.png

Does your student like to play with puppets or write stories? Here are some adorable community helper bag puppets to make and use.

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Books for your children to enjoy:

These two books are interactive, which I think will make these books interesting and enjoyable.

This is a fun matching game book with information about various jobs in the community. There is a story for each profession and a rhyming text for younger students to read.

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This looks like such an interesting book. “If your hands can mix and mash, what job might you have? What if your hands reach, wrench, yank, and crank? The hands in this book–and the people attached to them–do all sorts of helpful work. And together, these helpers make their community a safe and fun place to live.” (www.goodreads.com)

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Have a great week! -Lisa-

Videos for the 4th of July

Happy Independence Day! Before we go to a parade and eat hot dogs and hamburgers, how about studying what we are celebrating? Does your child know the original 13 colonies who declared independence from Great Britain? Do you? 🙂

You can have your patriot label and color the map of the original 13 colonies.

13 Colonies Printable Nies Blank Map Ring Page Pages Original Thirteen Free Nies Review Worksheets

The following videos are about some of the events that lead up to the war.  For older students, they can take notes on the videos. Be sure to discuss what you have watched afterward.

 

You can use the documents below for copywork, memorization, or recitation. I read some documents several years ago at our family gathering and what a discussion and a sense of the magnitude of what those men did for us to become an independent country settled on us that day. It made me thankful for their courage to stand up to tyranny.

Patrick Henry’s Speech to the Second Virginia Convention, 1775

The preamble to the Declaration of Independence

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

Declaration of Independence

If you have a poetry teatime, then Paul Revere’s Ride would be perfect. Listen to the cadence that this poem has as you read it aloud. It really does feel like you are riding on a horse! CLICK HERE

Looking for some activities to do with your children? Playdough to Plato has 25 things to do for your young patriots. CLICK HERE

Have a great week!  ~Lisa~

 

Memorial Day History

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Do your children know what we observe on Memorial Day? You can read this post to them; discuss the poem In Flanders Fields and have them copy it; attend a parade; visit a vet, or decorate graves of military personnel; making this holiday more personal as part of your history studies.  Here is the origin of this holiday from History.com

Memorial Day is an American holiday, observed on the last Monday of May, honoring the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. Originally known as Decoration Day, it originated in the years following the Civil War and became an official federal holiday in 1971. Many Americans observe Memorial Day by visiting cemeteries or memorials, holding family gatherings and participating in parades.

Early Observances of Memorial Day

The Civil War, which ended in the spring of 1865, claimed more lives than any conflict in U.S. history and required the establishment of the country’s first national cemeteries.

By the late 1860s, Americans in various towns and cities had begun holding springtime tributes to these countless fallen soldiers, decorating their graves with flowers and reciting prayers.

It is unclear where exactly this tradition originated; numerous different communities may have independently initiated the memorial gatherings. Nevertheless, in 1966 the federal government declared Waterloo, New York, the official birthplace of Memorial Day. It first celebrated the day on May 5, 1866, and was chosen because it hosted an annual, community-wide event, during which businesses closed and residents decorated the graves of soldiers with flowers and flags.

Henry Gunther

Concord/Wikimedia Commons/CC BY-SA 3.0

Decoration Day

On May 5, 1868, General John A. Logan, leader of an organization for Northern Civil War veterans, called for a nationwide day of remembrance later that month. “The 30th of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village and hamlet churchyard in the land,” he proclaimed.

The date of Decoration Day, as he called it, was chosen because it wasn’t the anniversary of any particular battle.

On the first Decoration Day, General James Garfield made a speech at Arlington National Cemetery, and 5,000 participants decorated the graves of the 20,000 Union and Confederate soldiers buried there.

Many Northern states held similar commemorative events and reprised the tradition in subsequent years; by 1890 each one had made Decoration Day an official state holiday. Southern states, on the other hand, continued to honor their dead on separate days until after World War I.

History of Memorial Day

Memorial Day, as Decoration Day gradually came to be known, originally honored only those lost while fighting in the Civil War. But during World War I the United States found itself embroiled in another major conflict, and the holiday evolved to commemorate American military personnel who died in all wars.

For decades, Memorial Day continued to be observed on May 30, the date Logan had selected for the first Decoration Day. But in 1968 Congress passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, which established Memorial Day as the last Monday in May in order to create a three-day weekend for federal employees; the change went into effect in 1971. The same law also declared Memorial Day a federal holiday.

Memorial Day Traditions

Cities and towns across the United States host Memorial Day parades each year, often incorporating military personnel and members of veterans’ organizations. Some of the largest parades take place in Chicago, New York and Washington, D.C.

Americans also observe Memorial Day by visiting cemeteries and memorials. Some people wear a red poppy in remembrance of those fallen in war—a tradition that began with a World War I poem, In Flanders Fields.

“In Flanders Fields” by John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.