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Veterans Day Ideas to Teach

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Today is a national holiday in which we honor all those who have served in our military. I thought I’d give a little background to when the holiday first began 100 years ago.

This holiday was originally known as Armistice Day to commemorate the signing of the peace treaty in which Germany agreed to the terms to end World War I on November 11, 1918, at 11:00.

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On November 11, 1919, U.S. President Woodrow Wilson issued a message to his countrymen on the first Armistice Day, in which he expressed what he felt the day meant to Americans:

ADDRESS TO FELLOW-COUNTRYMEN

The White House, November 11, 1919.

A year ago today our enemies laid down their arms in accordance with an armistice which rendered them impotent to renew hostilities, and gave to the world an assured opportunity to reconstruct its shattered order and to work out in peace a new and juster set of international relations. The soldiers and people of the European Allies had fought and endured for more than four years to uphold the barrier of civilization against the aggressions of armed force. We ourselves had been in the conflict something more than a year and a half.

With splendid forgetfulness of mere personal concerns, we remodeled our industries, concentrated our financial resources, increased our agricultural output, and assembled a great army, so that at the last our power was a decisive factor in the victory. We were able to bring the vast resources, material and moral, of a great and free people to the assistance of our associates in Europe who had suffered and sacrificed without limit in the cause for which we fought.

Out of this victory there arose new possibilities of political freedom and economic concert. The war showed us the strength of great nations acting together for high purposes, and the victory of arms foretells the enduring conquests which can be made in peace when nations act justly and in furtherance of the common interests of men.

To us in America the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service, and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of nations.

WOODROW WILSON   source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veterans_Day

IDEAS TO OBSERVE AND TEACH THIS DAY:

  • Call someone you know who is serving or who has served in the military and say thank you for their service to our country.
  • Make a card or write a letter to a veteran.  Operation Gratitude
  • Visit a veteran and make or take a treat to them. (cupcakes or cookies decorated with red, white, and blue frosting?)

Social Studies: Read and discuss the above speech that President Wilson made. It’s always a great idea to look at an original source document instead of reading about it secondhand.

Questions to investigate:

  • What were the terms of the treaty?
  • Who signed the treaty?
  • Where was it signed? Why was this location used for the signing of the treaty? Why use a train car and not a building?

What is a primary source document? secondary source document? Here is a resource that you can purchase that is all ready for you to use: Primary and Secondary Sources

Language Arts:

  • Notice that Veterans is a plural and not a possessive noun. Have a grammar lesson to explain this.
  • For your older students, you can introduce vocabulary such as armistice, peace treaty,  memorial, sympathy, gratitude

Math: How many countries were involved in The Great War? How many people died during the war?

Health: Many people died after the war due to the Spanish Flu. Discuss disease prevention. You can read about it and see primary source documents here-  Spanish Flu

If you or a family member has served in the military, here is a list of restaurants that have free meals today: FREE MEALS

My deepest thank you to you who have served us in a military capacity.  Happy Veteran’s Day! ~ Lisa ~ 

 

Draw and Write Through History

Are you interested in combining history, art, and cursive this year? The Draw and Write Through History series of six books does just that.

The workbooks are in full-color and are Non-consumable. The recommended ages are 8 and up. I think this would be fun to do together with your son or daughter. They are affordable with each priced at $10.00 or if you purchase all 6 you save $1.00 per book. These are from a Christian worldview and are divided into the following time periods:   Creation to Jonah  |  600BC to 395AD  |  793AD to 1600s |1492 to 1781  |  The 1800s  | 20th Century

If you are curious to learn more, here is a description of the second book, Greece and Rome. “Take your children on an exciting journey through time as you draw and write your way through history! Learn how to draw a Greek soldier, the Lighthouse of Alexandria, The Great Wall of China, Hannibal’s war elephants, the Colosseum, a gladiator, and more in this second book in the Draw and Write Through History series. Each drawing is broken down into easy to follow steps. Cursive handwriting copywork about history is also included.” (source: http://www.amazon.com)

 

Have a great week!  ~Lisa ~ 

Amoeba Sisters: Biology Fun

Biology can be boring, intimidating and frustrating if you don’t have an understanding of the topic. I have a great resource for you called Amoeba Sisters. These are 10 minute or less videos with fun cartoons and interesting biology topics. They also have gifs that you can print off as well as worksheets.

Here is a link to the videos:  Amoeba Sisters 

What about looking at their website? Clicking on the picture will take you to the website.

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Have a fabulous week! ~Lisa~

Community Helpers

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Community helpers cover a broad spectrum in our society and children are taught about them in early elementary school. Having hands-on activities is a fun way to discuss what a community helper is (someone who serves the community) and what types of things they do. You can use these as an introduction to a unit for Social Studies, something you and your child do together, or independent activity as a culminating activity.  Click on the image of each picture to take you directly to the link.

Whose Tools is a free folder game for your student to learn about helpers.

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Community Helpers Matching Worksheet Does your daughter or son know what tools each of these professionals need for their job?

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Free Sorting Mats of Community Helpers. You can laminate these for durability to be reused. This is only a sample and you can purchase additional mats for this unit.

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Community Helper Hats You can use these hats for play or for sorting. The directions are easy to follow to make the hat, and there is also a video should you wish to watch it. The police officer hat is free and if you would like to receive all 10 hats, sign up for the newsletter. Screen Shot 2019-07-08 at 6.19.31 AM.png

Does your student like to play with puppets or write stories? Here are some adorable community helper bag puppets to make and use.

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Books for your children to enjoy:

These two books are interactive, which I think will make these books interesting and enjoyable.

This is a fun matching game book with information about various jobs in the community. There is a story for each profession and a rhyming text for younger students to read.

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This looks like such an interesting book. “If your hands can mix and mash, what job might you have? What if your hands reach, wrench, yank, and crank? The hands in this book–and the people attached to them–do all sorts of helpful work. And together, these helpers make their community a safe and fun place to live.” (www.goodreads.com)

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Have a great week! -Lisa-

Videos for the 4th of July

Happy Independence Day! Before we go to a parade and eat hot dogs and hamburgers, how about studying what we are celebrating? Does your child know the original 13 colonies who declared independence from Great Britain? Do you? 🙂

You can have your patriot label and color the map of the original 13 colonies.

13 Colonies Printable Nies Blank Map Ring Page Pages Original Thirteen Free Nies Review Worksheets

The following videos are about some of the events that lead up to the war.  For older students, they can take notes on the videos. Be sure to discuss what you have watched afterward.

 

You can use the documents below for copywork, memorization, or recitation. I read some documents several years ago at our family gathering and what a discussion and a sense of the magnitude of what those men did for us to become an independent country settled on us that day. It made me thankful for their courage to stand up to tyranny.

Patrick Henry’s Speech to the Second Virginia Convention, 1775

The preamble to the Declaration of Independence

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

Declaration of Independence

If you have a poetry teatime, then Paul Revere’s Ride would be perfect. Listen to the cadence that this poem has as you read it aloud. It really does feel like you are riding on a horse! CLICK HERE

Looking for some activities to do with your children? Playdough to Plato has 25 things to do for your young patriots. CLICK HERE

Have a great week!  ~Lisa~