Teaching Cursive Handwriting

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Cursive = Dodo bird?

Every year during homeschool assessments I get asked the question. “Should I be teaching my child how to write in cursive?” Years ago I would respond to this by saying I think everyone should be able to read important historical documents and be able to sign your name on important legal documents. But, after reading and more research, I have learned there is much more to knowing how to write cursive than just that. Here are just a few of the benefits of cursive.

You can read all forms of written communication. It surprises me as to how many of my junior high students say they cannot read cursive. I have to write in manuscript if I want them to be able to read the comments I have made on their papers.

It is good for the brain. By writing in cursive, both hemispheres of the brain are engaged. It is also multisensory, using the brain, the hands, and fingers to coordinate in order to produce letters.

It is good for fine motor skills. We use our small muscles for movements that occur in the wrists, hands, fingers, feet and toes. It also involves gross motor skills because cursive involves using your arm and has been referred to as whole body writing.

It increases the speed of writing. In cursive writing, letters are connected and nearly all are made in a forward motion. With print, your pencil (or pen) must be taken off of the page and placed nearby the other strokes you have created to form a letter. For instance, a lower case k is taught by first drawing a vertical line and then picking up your pencil and making a sideways v that needs to connect midway onto the vertical line that was just drawn.

It helps dyslexic students. I have written about this topic before, so here is the link to read if you are interested. CLICK HERE

Cursive can be individualized. If you have a creative, artsy child, they can make cursive their own style after they learn how to read and write traditional cursive. Calligraphy is a fun to learn as well.

Ready to get started? Here are some resources for you.

A Reason for Handwriting  This series has scriptures that are copied after the letters have been learned. The publishers have a transitions book that will be helpful in teaching cursive.

Horizons Penmanship Grades 1-5  Cursive is introduced midway through 2nd grade. Correct placement of hands, letter formation, and posture are all covered. Each book has a theme that is used throughout the book.

Handwriting Without TearsMany families with boys love this program and say this is easier than anything else they have taught.  It is simple and straightforward.

Draw Write Now incorporates penmanship, writing and drawing! You can pick from different themes and levels. My sons loved using these books.

Looking for online programs ? Handwriting Worksheets and Writing Wizard would be great places to start. These programs allow you to create your own worksheets, everything from single words to paragraphs.

Happy Writing!  ~ Lisa ~

 

 

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